Questions? Feedback? powered by Olark live chat software

This is the off canvas left section for the custom search filters

This is the off canvas left section test to have multiple left off canvas instances

Trout Fishing in Gatlinburg TN

In order to legally fish in the Smoky Mountains and Gatlinburg TN, you will need the necessary permit required by the state of Tennessee. For ages 9 - 64, a local permit is required and for nonresidents 9 years old and above. Other required permits can be required for all other ages and the handicapped. Check with the local licensings agent for more detail. Permits are available at the City Hall, Department of Tourism Welcome Center, and many other places in Gatlinburg TN. To help make your fishing trip complete, rent one of our Gatlinburg cabin rentals from and make your stay spectacular!

License Cost For more information ask Tennessee Wildlife Resource agent for assistance. Prices may vary from what is listed below.

• 8 years old and under: No License Required
• 9 years old to 12 years old: In Gatlinburg waters you ONLY need a Gatlinburg One-day
• Permit (Type 99): Cost is $2.50
• Up to 13 years old in regular waters (NON GATLINBURG): No License Required
• Age 13 to 15 years old: Junior Hunt and Fish (Type 70): Cost is $6.00; and they are good for one year - Inside Gatlinburg waters, they will also need Gatlinburg One-day permit (Type 99): Cost is $2.50 per dayOR they may purchase a Gatlinburg One-day Nonresident Permit (Type 97): Cost is $10.50
• Three day fishing no trout: (Type 77): Cost is $10.50 (Not Valid for Gatlinburg Waters)
• Three day All Species: (Type 78): Cost is $20.50 for Gatlinburg, but in addition, you need a Type 99 license to fish the Gatlinburg Waters
• Ten day Fishing no trout: (Type 79): Cost is $15.50 not valid for Gatlinburg Waters
• Ten day all species: (Type 80): Cost is $30.50 for Gatlinburg, but in addition, you need Type 99 license to fish the Gatlinburg Waters
• Annual all fish: (Type 81): Cost is $51.00 for Gatlinburg, but you need the daily Type 99 to fish in Gatlinburg waters in addition to Type 80
• One day nonresident Gatlinburg waters only: (Type 97): Cost is $10.50
• Gatlinburg One-day Permit: (Type 99): Cost is $2.50, must be used in addition to Type 78, Type 80, or Type 81 unless under the age of 13

Seasons:

One season stretches from April 1 through November 30; The daily creel limit limits any fisher to five trout. If you are caught with possessions of more than that of the daily creel limit you will be prosecuted.

One season stretches from December the 1 through March 31; You are only allowed to use artificial lures with a single hook. All trout caught must be set free into the water without harm. You may not have any trout in your possession from December 1 till March 31. If you fail follow these guide lines you will be dealt with accordingly.

Fishing Year ‘Round; Fishing is only allowed during daylight hours, one - half hour prior to sunrise and one - half hour after sunset. Every Thursday all streams are closed.

General Streams

1. West Prong Little Pigeon River from Park Boundary downstream to Gnatty Branch, except those sections set aside as Children's Streams.
2. Dudley Creek from Park Boundary downstream to West Prong Little Pigeon River, except those sections set aside as Children's Streams.3. Roaring Fork from Park Boundary downstream to West Prong Little River.4. LeConte Creek from Painters Branch downstream to West Prong Little River.Fishing is permitted with one-held rod and single hook only.
Children's Streams1. LeConte Creek from Painters Branch upstream to Park Boundary.
2. West Prong Little River from a point to 100 yards above the North Gatlinburg Park Entrance downstream to the Gatlinburg By-pass Bridge.
3. Dudley Creek from the Highway 441 Bridge downstream to the West Prong Little Pigeon River.

The creel limit is two (2) trout per day for children twelve and under when fishing in Children's Streams. You may only fish with one-held rod and single hook only.

Proper way to release fish

1. Play a fish as rapidly as possible, to much can lead to exhaustion.2. Keep fish in water as much as possible.3. Handle fish with wet hand even while you use a mesh landing net.4. Remove hook gently, do not pull on it. Use long-nose pliers to back the hook out gently. The use of barbless hooks work much better.5. If deeply hooked, cut the line, do not pull the hook out. Most fish survive with hooks left in them.6. Gently hold fish upright facing upstream and move slowly back and forth in the water. Going from air to water can kill them.7. Release fish in water that is not rough.